Thursday, December 21, 2006

Shampoo cancer

girl washing her with shampoo
Myth : "Shampoo causes cancer"





True
or false ?







This is the message that's been freaking out people for several years.

Check the ingredients listed on your shampoo bottle, and see if they have substance by the name of Sodium Laureth Sulfate, or simply SLS. This substance is found in most shampoos, and the manufacturers use it because it produces a lot of foam and it is cheap. BUT the fact is that SLS is used to scrub garage floors, and it is very strong. It is also proven that it can cause cancer in the long run, and this is no joke. I went home and checked my shampoo (Vidal Sassoon); it doesn't contain it; however, others such as Vo5, Palmolive, Paul Mitchell, the new Hemp Shampoo .. contain this substance. The first ingredient listed (which means it is the single most prevalent ingredient) in Clairol's Herbal Essences is Sodium Laureth Sulfate.

So I called one company, and I told them their product contains a substance that will cause people to have cancer. They said,"Yeah, we knew about it but there is nothing we can do about it because we need that substance to produce foam. By the way Colgate toothpaste also contains the same substance to produce the "bubbles". They said they are going to send me some information. Research has shown that in the 1980s, the chance of getting cancer is 1 out of 8000 and now, in the 1990s, the chances of getting cancer is 1 out of 3, which is very serious. So I hope that you will take this seriously and pass this on to all the people you know, and hopefully, we can stop "giving" ourselves the cancer virus.

Don't forget, this is real and serious, after you have read this, pass it on to as many people
as possible, this is not a chain letter, but it concerns our health.

Relax, this is not true !

The SLS substance can be found in shampoos, soaps and other detergents and it is, in fact, a foamer. For those with a sensitive skin, the drying property of this substance can produce flare-ups of skin and/or irritation.

Quoted from Wiki.org :
Rumors have circulated widely on the internet that SLS/SLES are carcinogenic. They have spread through chain emails citing a fake report supposedly published by the Journal of the American College of Toxicology. No legitimate evidence can be found to support this claim. In response to the rumour, the Cosmetics Toiletry and Fragrance Association (CTFA) and the American Cancer Society have confirmed it to be an urban legend
You can read more about this detergent here.

In an earlier post, I was pointing out some clues that give away a story like this but I never mentioned how you can actually recognize a phony story.
There are many types of myths but I'm going to stick to those similar to "shampoo causes cancer".

These crappy stories, that fill up you e-mail box, can be very persuasive, and they are all trying to convince you that the message it's sending to you is true (or not). Generaly, the mission for this rumors is creating panic, that's why most of these myths are about diseases, death, cancer, etc. caused by something one uses regularly. For example, shampoo causes cancer. Shampoo is used by lots and lots of people and cancer is something that lots and lots of people are afraid of. (can you see where I'm going? If not, then stop reading )
They all look the same.
The first part of the story (the header) includes a short description of what the message is about; some of those short descriptions come with sentences like "This is true !" . - Just like a fairy tale :) -
The middle part of the story includes the message. Now, this message contains lots of details and scientific terms(e.g. Sodium Laureth Sulfate), that usually confuses the average Joe, and come from one or a group of "experts" or from someone that claims he/she did some research and came up with the same verdict. For example :
"So I called one company, and I told them ... their product contains a substance that will cause cancer. They said,"Yeah, we knew about it but there is nothing we can do about it because we need that substance to produce foam."

The last part (the footer) comes with a reminder ("don't forget, this is serious..."), and somewhat of a request from the author, to help spreading it.

Don't forget, this is real and serious, after you have read this, pass it on to as many people as possible...

These are the basic key elements that help you recognize untrue stories.

Don't forget that nowadays, every story like this will certainly make it on the front page of every online or offline newspaper and you will hear about it.

Cheers !

2 comments:

Justin said...

WHew... thank goodness. On the first part of the article, i thought that i couldn't take showeres anymore!!:) -Justin

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

get the latest busted myths